Vegetables- Nutrition Information

Vegetables
– Nutrition Information




artichoke


asparagus


beet


broccoli


brussels sprout


cabbage


carrot


cauliflower


celery


chili pepper


corn

cucumber


eggplant


green bean


kale


lettuce


mushroom


okra


onion


pea


potato


pumpkin

radish


rutabaga


spinach


squash


sweet pepper


sweet potato


tomato


turnip


watercress


yam


zucchini




Nutrient values are for raw vegetables.



See Fresh Produce Safety for ways to minimize your exposure to any contaminants that can cause foodborne illness.



Did you know?


Red foods contain lycopene, the pigment in tomatoes, which is localized in the prostate gland and may be involved in maintaining prostate health.

Yellow-green vegetables, such as corn and leafy greens, contain lutein and zeaxanthin, which are localized in the retina where age-related macular degeneration occurs.

Orange foods, including carrots, pumpkin and winter squash, contain beta-carotene.

Green foods, including broccoli, Brussels sprouts and kale, contain glucosinolates.

White-green foods in the onion family contain allyl sulfides.

The National Cancer Institute and American Institute for Cancer Research guidelines say to ingest five to nine vegetable and fruit servings per day.


source: J Nutr. 2001 Nov;131(11 Suppl):3078S-81S. — Applying science to changing dietary patterns. Heber D, Bowerman S.








Nutrition InformationHealthy Recipes





source: USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference
Release 18, 2006 – Nutrition and Diet Data




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